Why You Should Use Prescription Toothpaste

It Costs An Arm and A Leg, But Your Dentist Will Be Happy!

 

I just finished the second part of my root canal and am feeling intense pain in my wallet.  Just to jog your memory in case you missed my last rant, I had a root canal on one of my molars and a temporary seal was applied.

After a few weeks I had a post put in to stabilize that area and now I am good to go until next year when my dental benefits start again. I usually need another root canal, or have an old decayed crown yanked out and a new one put in its place.

One thing that changed this year was that my dentist started me on prescription toothpaste with fluoride.  I thought it would be a lot better than swishing around the liquid fluoride that you get at the end of every cleaning that you feel like you want to spit out from the moment it hits your mouth.

You produce less saliva in menopause and the resulting dry mouth can lead to more cavities. Bone loss also increases your risk for cavities. In some cases, your roots can be showing and your teeth look a lot longer. All of these things make prescription toothpaste a no-brainer.

Prescription fluoride toothpaste is absorbed into the roots and enamel and makes your teeth stronger. When your brush your teeth, use your regular toothpaste, but switch to the prescription toothpaste when you brush before bedtime.

You’ve probably heard that most dentists say to brush for at least two minutes and preferably three if you can stand it.  You only need a thin line of toothpaste and it’s better if you use an electric toothbrush. I stand in front of the clock and hum the happy birthday song.  It seems like an eternity waiting for two minutes to go by, but when the time is up, I make a mad dash for the bathroom to rinse it all out.

According to the American Dental Association, you should change the head of your toothbrush every three to four months, and sooner if the bristles are frayed. Don’t forget to floss because toothpaste doesn’t always clean those hard-to-get-to places.

Check with your insurance plan to see if this is a covered benefit. Mine would not pay, and I ended up spending $25 for a four-ounce tube. It sucks that you have to pay that much, and you would rather spend the money on yourself, but think of it as an investment in your dental future.

The Great Cholesterol Debate

How Many Eggs Can You Safely Eat in a Week?

 

It’s challenging enough to cope with menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, weight gain, and high blood pressure, without having to worry about high cholesterol levels. This is meant to be an enjoyable time in your life, and that includes eating your favorite foods.

If you go to a breakfast buffet, you’ll see a long line at the omelet station. Most people wouldn’t even think of eating breakfast without eggs, and a made-to-order omelet with all the meat and cheese you want is an egg lovers dream.

There has been a debate in the medical community for years over how many eggs you can eat without raising your cholesterol levels. Now, there is good news for egg lovers. According to a 2015 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it’s safe to eat twelve eggs a week. The trick is to find healthier ways to prepare eggs, so you don’t have to feel deprived.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one large egg has about 180mg cholesterol and it’s all in the yolk.  I like hardboiled eggs, which are high in potassium, zinc, iron, vitamin E, and folate. At only 80 calories, I can have a nutritious breakfast or snack without breaking the calorie bank.

Poached eggs are easy to prepare. Add a splash of vinegar to a pan of simmering water, tip in the egg, and leave for three minutes. Drain with a slotted spoon and you’re ready to chow down.

Eggs are not usually prepared as a stand-alone dish, and are often accompanied by bacon, sausage, ham, or hash browns, and the saturated fat or oil you’re using to prepare these side dishes can increase your risk of a heart attack.

If you like a more substantial breakfast, take a whole-grain tortilla, and stuff it with scrambled eggs, lean turkey sausage, and diced tomato. You can bake low-fat eggs in a bread bowl for a special weekend breakfast or brunch.

Stay away from high-calorie toppings such as sour cream or cheese. Invest in a non-stick skillet so you don’t have to use oil when you fry your eggs. You can top eggs with salsa, or use herbs such as parsley, tarragon, or chives.

Prepare a whole-grain cereal to go with your eggs so you cover all the nutritional bases, or if you want to serve eggs for dinner pair with your favorite vegetables.

 

 

Comfort Foods You’ll Go Nuts Over

You Won't Even Have to Buy a New Wardrobe!

I have to admit that I am a foodie and comfort foods are high on my favorites list.  Extra crispy fried chicken, pizza, meatloaf, macaroni and cheese, I could gain weight just thinking about them. If I knew I wouldn’t put on ten pounds, I would probably cook them every week.

If you’re like me, you want to be healthy in menopause, but you don’t want to miss out on your old favorite foods. The trick is to learn to cook the same foods with a healthy twist, and you can maintain your shape and still be satisfied.

Here are five healthier versions of your favorite comfort foods:

Meatloaf

My family had meatloaf every week growing up, and I always looked forward to a big slice drowned in catsup.

The traditional meatloaf recipes are usually made with ground beef or pork, and that is an awful lot of fat and sodium. Lighten things up by substituting ground turkey and you’ll lose half the fat but none of the taste.

Fried Chicken

Who can resist an extra crispy piece or two of fried chicken? I have to admit our family often made the short drive to KFC and bought a barrel of chicken and a few sides.

Try this tasty recipe that browns on the stove, then finishes in the oven. Flour and cornmeal make the chicken crunchy so you won’t feel deprived.  Each piece is only 2.5 grams of saturated fat.

Lasagna

Lasagna is easy to put together and my version starts with uncooked noodles. Unfortunately, the other layers of ground beef, sour cream and cottage cheese pack a big fat wallop. I never forgot to add a pretty good-sized package of mozzarella cheese to make the final fat count go sky-high.

A lighter version of lasagna features store-bought pesto, and whole-wheat lasagna noodles. Skim milk mozzarella and ricotta cheeses give you that tasty cheese bite, but not all the fat and calories.

Yummy Brownies

Of course you have to have dessert, at least according to my mom, who served dessert every night. Brownies are one of my favorites, and the more chocolate the better. I guess I have to be a killjoy and say that most brownies have too much sugar, fat, and calories. I am still waiting for new research that says brownies will prolong your life.

I found an unusual brownie recipe that calls for spinach, black beans, and applesauce. There is still an abundance of chocolate and even some pecans to give them some crunch.

Give these recipes a try and see if they fit into your healthy lifestyle.